Why EC2 isn’t yet a platform for “normal” web applications

In a previous article, On Grids, the Ambitions of Amazon and Joyent, I made a few premises: The autoprovisioning and account management (and therefore the accessibility) is the improvement over a service like Sun’s Grid There’s no way that Amazon.com is literally coming off of S3 and EC2 (one datacenter and no CDN abilities? I Continue reading Why EC2 isn’t yet a platform for “normal” web applications

DTrace for Ruby is available

In previous posts we’ve mentioned we’re working on a full Ruby DTrace provider set for Ruby 1.8.5. We’ve finished a solid base set of probes and it is ready for general consumption. The subversion repository is at http://svn.joyent.com/ruby-dtrace. The repository contains: The full Ruby 1.8.5 source with DTrace probes (http://svn.joyent.com/ruby-dtrace/ruby-1.8.5) Diffs (http://svn.joyent.com/ruby-dtrace/patches) Binaries (http://svn.joyent.com/ruby-dtrace/binaries/solaris) Examples Continue reading DTrace for Ruby is available

OK nginx is cool

For the simple reason that it’s the only static web server I’ve seen that supports Solaris’s Event Ports events { worker_connections 1024; use eventport; } I’m cutting over the ton of static servers we have to it. If you’re interested in a x86/64 build for Solaris http://assets1.joyent.com/opt-nginx-amd64-build.tgz http://assets1.joyent.com/opt-pcre7-amd64-build.tgz Just drop it in place $ ln Continue reading OK nginx is cool

On Accelerators

Fundamental Philosophy and Origin Accelerators rose from two needs: a standardized stack capable of serving our own growing applications and the appearance last year of large companies and startups needing “enterprise rails”. Our applications, like Strongspace and the Joyent Connector are over 2 years old now, were some of the earliest revenue-generating Rails applications and Continue reading On Accelerators

How to completely ruin a great piece of server kit (regarding the Sun X4200 M2)

Here’s how you do it. First, you take what is considered a pinnacle of x86 server design, the glorious x4200 where every single chip has been selected for maximum reliability and performance. Like, say, the quad on-board Intel Gigabit Ethernet chips. Then, you create a new revision called the x4200 “M2” and replace the first Continue reading How to completely ruin a great piece of server kit (regarding the Sun X4200 M2)

A brief update with some numbers for hardware load-balanced mongrels

Back in August, I posted about a good-sized evaluation I was going to start doing about the horizontal scaling of different proxy engines and load-balancers across lots of mongrels. But in short, we’ve stayed with F5’s BIG-IPs for at least one additional reason beyond their ability to handled gigabits of traffic across many many backend Continue reading A brief update with some numbers for hardware load-balanced mongrels